Stories from Paradise, Gobind Sadan December 21, 1992: A Great Person | Stories from Paradise, Gobind Sadan

December 21, 1992: A Great Person

These are notes in my diary from an important but informal talk Maharaj gave to us today:

A person who wants to do great work needs a peaceful home. There should be no worry at all near his mind. His mind should be very safe from worldly things and worried people His body and thoughts should both be flexible.

A great person is one whose thoughts are great, whose energies and life are for the people. His love is for God and for the people of God. Skin color is of no consequence—his qualities are what counts. Vyasa (writer of the Vedas) did not have a good personality but he was a great scholar and visionary.

There are two types of personalities: One is based on outer dress and color, the other is based on inner qualities and good actions. The prophets excel in both qualities: They have both inner and outer beauty, like Lord Krishna. But the stress was on inner qualities. They came with inner light. Among crores of people, you can recognize the king or prophet by the light of their face. In the past, the king was recognized by his enlightenment from meditation. These days, neither kings nor spiritual teachers are meditating.

In Kali Yuga (this darkest of the four Ages), only a little tapasya (disciplined spiritual practice) goes a very long way. Always thank Him. Your heart should always be kind. They asked the Guru, “Do you worry?” He said, “Yes, I worry for the sake of others.”

When a person of God talks, people do not understand him. He feels, “Whether you consider me bad or good does not bother me—I have given my body to God. I am free. Everything is up to Him. Do you think I’ll be angry when you criticize me? Happy when you flatter me?”

When he finished talking to us, Maharaj observed that our questions to him are good to clear our minds and bring forth the teachings. But as for me, he said, my questions are finished. It’s true. When I am sitting with him, no questions arise. I am there only to listen, hopefully to learn, and to record what he says for posterity. My desire is that everyone in the world shall have access to his teachings and his transformational blessings.

This is a big wish. Once Maharaj looked at me kindly and said,

You’re like a little mouse—a little mouse standing at the edge of a huge pile of grain, just nibbling. But you have to eat the whole pile of grain. Or you’re like a little mouse standing at the edge of a great ocean, just sipping. But you have to drink the whole ocean! But you know how it is with mice: At night they get into the walls and ceiling of the house [he was referring to wooden frame houses] and chew the wood so loudly that you think nothing will be left of the place. But when you get up in the morning, everything still looks the same. That’s how it is with mice.